20160310

end cap - looking back these past 5+ years on e-Ink

On balance eBook reading is a good thing: every person can become publisher and distributor, and some can make a living there, too. Here is what most continues to appeal to me.

-holds lots of materials (searchable, able to group/organize)
-send web content directly to the device for reading later/offline
-annotations (highlighter or notes) saved at kindle.amazon.com for filing or extracting
-Popular Highlights offers a quick way to discover salient passages based on crowd source
-sample chapter (author interview spurs you to get a chapter & ToC almost instantly)
-personal docs can be uploaded to carry around or reference

User experience is worth looking at, too:

During the past year or so, my downloaded free samples, free books, some monthly featured (marked down) books have migrated onto my backlit phone and/or tablet. The phone is frequently at hand, both for photos and for reading. So form factor leads me to snatch short stints of reading that way. Frequently I'm in poor lighting when reading urge or opportunity arises, so backlit reading beats my old kindle-keyboard. But when motivation is high then I make time to read in a well lit, quiet setting. That is when e-Ink excels.

The other snag to recurrent kindle ebook reader use is that I tend to be a magpie - sending content to device, but failing to read it. The result is more and more bulk on the device which seems to diminish its responsiveness. The solution may be to dump the files from Documents Folder onto PC and then load to read single files or smallish groups of files at a time. But, off course, to do so adds a layer of manipulation; far easier and appealing to download to phone, read or skim, possibly to share or reflect upon the author's work and/or engage with them.

In conclusion I'm pleased with several ebook reader functions on e-Ink, but also a little weary from the flood of written  work that I've gathered and feel unmotivated to work through it all. Perhaps the wizards at amazon will have work-arounds for eager digital reading advocates like me who have gotten bogged down or lost that 'shiny, new charm'.

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